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13 Favourite Cookbooks of 2015

Heidi's Red Lentil Hummus-2

Like any good addict, I have little stashes all over the house…

There’s a stack on my bedside table, on the bookshelf in my studio, in the lounge room. But it’s my kitchen stash of cookbooks (pictured above) that really tells the tale.

Why?

Because these are the ones that I’ve actually cooked something from recently.

I love cookbooks. I never get tired of flipping through the pages, reading every detail. Getting inspired. Getting hungry.

Here are my current faves. (ie. the ones in the kitchen squashed in next to my toaster).

13 Favourite Cookbooks of 2015

1. My New Roots by Sarah Britton
You wouldn’t think a ‘plant based’ book would be helpful for someone who was experimenting with eating ‘full Paleo’. But back in September when I was such an experimenter I found Sarah’s book really useful for alternatives to dairy. If you have any interest in creative ways to cook more veg this beautiful, vegetable-focused book is a winner. Checkout Sarah’s blog for a taste of what’s in store.

2. Mr Hong by Dan Hong
I can’t help but think of Dan Hong as Sydney’s answer to David Chang, the chef behind the Momofuku empire. This is the book I reach for when I’m after some serious deliciousness. From ‘secret’ tacos to amazing curries I love Hong’s work. Definitely a lot more than 5 ingredients though.

3. Near & Far by Heidi Swanson
A girl after my own heart, Heidi Swanson from 101 Cookbooks loves food and travel. She’s combined both passions in this stunning book. I especially enjoyed reading about her travels in Japan, Morocco and India and the accompanying recipes. Lots of tasty new vegetarian ideas including the Red Lentil Hummus recipe below.

4. Deliciously Ella by Ella Woodward
Another plant based blogger, it’s hard not to be caught up with Ella’s enthusiasm for veggies and real food. A self-taught cook Ella’s recipes err on the side of simplicity that I like.

5. Four Kitchens by Colin Fassnidge
Speaking of the word simplicity, it doesn’t really seem to be in Dublin / Sydney chef Colin Fassnidge’s vocabulary. That being said, I’ve loved this book as inspiration for my more extravagant weekend cooking. Especially when entertaining. There’s lots of effort required but sometimes even I enjoy making more complicated dishes as long as the deliciousness factor is there.

6. Kitchen by Mike by Mike McEnearney
I was devoed (that’s devastated in case you’re wondering) when I found that the Kitchen by Mike restaurant in Sydney had closed. But thankfully I had Mikes book which is a lovely tribute to the seasons with a balance between health and deliciousness that not many chefs get right. Good news is he’s opening in new digs in 2016.

7. Going Paleo by Pete Evans
This was an impulse purchase that inspired me to experiment with a month of eating ‘full paleo’ back in September. Not for everyone. But I did find some good ideas for making the paleo transition. And in case you’re wondering, I’ve gone back to eating what I call ‘mostly paleo’ so including legumes and dairy because I didn’t feel any extra benefits with the extra restriction. And boy did I miss my cheese.

8. Recipes for a Good Time by Ben Milgate and Elvis
I was going to write, ‘another Sydney chef book’ but these aren’t just any Sydney chefs. They own Porteno, the restaurant where my Irishman and I had our wedding ceremony and reception. So these guys hold a very special place in my heart. While there’s a lot of amazing meat recipes, it’s worth buying just to find out their secret to their amazing brussels sprouts with lentils.

9. A Platter of Figs and Other Recipes by David Tanis
OK confession time. SO I had a plan to cook every meal from David Tanis’ poetic book this year. And while I did make it half way through, I had to quit. As much as I loved the food, the multi course meals were too much for me to attempt, even on a Saturday night once I got pregnant and started going to bed at nanna o’clock.

10. In Search of Perfection by Heston Blumenthal
This might seem like the odd one out given that Heston and I fall at the completely opposite ends of the simple-complex cooking range. While I haven’t cooked anything from this book exactly, I have taken some inspiration from it. And my Irishman uses it to make his killer spaghetti bolognese. I do love Heston and the fact that he’s made food science sexy.

11. The Agrarian Kitchen by Rodney Dunn
If you’re ever thinking of visiting Tasmania, make sure you book in for a cooking class at the Agrarian Kitchen. My Irishman and I have done their chacuterie course and another on cooking with fire and loved every minute. It also helps that Rodney is one of the nicest guys ever. Love his paddock to plate approach to cooking.

12. River Cottage Australia by Paul West
I’m a huge huge fan of Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and the original River Cottage series so I wasn’t sure how I would find an Australian version. Truth is I love it! The recipes tend to be your classics in a made-from-scratch way. If you’re looking for inspiration and new ideas you might not find them here. Although I have book marked the cheese making section to try one day.

13. The Blue Ducks Real Food by Mark Labrooy & Darren Robertson
My Irishman gave me a copy of the Blue Duck’s latest book for my birthday and I’ve loved everything I’ve made from it so far. The focus on real food is really refreshing. And I love that there’s a section devoted to fermented foods like sauerkraut and kimchi.

Looking for a delicious Christmas gift?

5 ingredients 10 minutes cover image

Since we’re talking cookbooks, I couldn’t not mention my own print book, 5 Ingredients 10 Minutes. It’s been a while since I’ve spoken about it but when I was in London in June I had coffee with my publisher and was very excited to learn that they had recently done a second print run!

And to give you an extra incentive to grab a copy (or a few), I’ve brought back the bonus Online Cooking Classes to accompany the book.

For more details go to:
www.5ingredients10minutes.com/bonus510/

NOTE: Bonues end 23rd December 2015.
_____

Heidi's Red Lentil Hummus

Heidi’s Red Lentil Hummus

As much as I love playing around with different versions of hummus, AND as much as I adore red lentils, I can’t believe I hadn’t ever thought to put the two together. As soon as I read Heidi’s recipe I was itching to try it. While similar to hummus made from chickpeas, there’s a subtle difference in flavour. But the best part is it only takes a few minutes to cook the lentils unlike chickpeas which need soaking and long simmering. I might even go as far as to say this is my new go-to hummus recipe.

makes: about 3 cups
takes: 25 minutes

250g (9oz) red lentils
2/3 cup tahini
3-4 tablespoons lemon
2 cloves garlic, crushed

1. Bring a pot of water to the boil. Add lentils and simmer for 8-10 minutes or until just tender. Drain really well and allow to cool.

2. Whizz lentils, tahini, lemon and garlic in a food processor until really smooth. Give it a good 5 minutes.

3. Taste and season generously with salt. Heidi calls for 3/4 teaspoon. If the hummus is too thick add a little water, whey or extra lemon. If too runny (like mine was) add more tahini. Whizz and taste again and adjust as needed until you’re happy.

4. Serve with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil anywhere you’d normally serve chickpea hummus.

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Video version of the recipe.

Variations

no tahini – the purists won’t like it but cashew or almond butter works fine instead.

milder – skip the garlic.

other legumes – use 2.5 cups cooked chickpeas, white beans or other lentils.

paleo – replace lentils with cooked root veg. Roast sweet potato is especially delish. No need to simmer of course.

Big love,
Jules x

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ps. And a BIG thanks for all the lovely comments and messages about my gestational diabetes diagnosis last week.

I really appreciate your kind thoughts. And the good news is, I’m actually finding it fascinating to be checking my blood sugar after every single meal. So enlightening to be putting my nutritional theories to the test on a day to day basis.

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{ 17 comments… add one }
  • Larissa 2 December, 2015, 8:36 am

    I always find it funny that we’re not vegetarian, but I have so many vegetarian and vegan cookbooks. We love doing meat-free a few times a week though, lots of fresh veg and herbs some of it even comes from the garden (I only have a khaki thumb, at best).

  • Susanne 2 December, 2015, 9:03 am

    Jules just wanted to share the one cookbook of the year with you, the forest feast by Erin Gleeson. The photography is so amazing, recipes easy and so delicious! Susanne
    PS My husband and I love all your cookbooks too, they are cookbooks for a lifetime!

    • jules 3 December, 2015, 7:09 pm

      Thx for the tip and the kind words Susanne! Jx

  • Daryle in VT 2 December, 2015, 9:11 am

    There seems to be a specialty cook book for every eater: vegetarian, paleo, gluten-free, etc.
    I’m looking for the probably apocryphal cook book titled, “Thirty-one Suppers for the Omnivorous.”

    • jules 3 December, 2015, 7:08 pm

      Sure someone will come up with the brilliant idea to cater for omnivores one day Daryle ;)

  • Linda 2 December, 2015, 1:37 pm

    I love Heidi’s books too and have Near & Far on my Christmas list. Also, once you’re baby’s born (and mine, although that will be this week) we should do a cheese making day with the PG gang.

    Hope you’re feeling well. I didn’t get a chance to chat about your dietary changes yesterday but I’m keen to learn more.

    Linda. x

    • jules 3 December, 2015, 7:07 pm

      Love the idea of a cheese making day Linda! And happy to talk about diet any time.. One of my fave topics Jx

  • Katie 2 December, 2015, 7:51 pm

    I absolutely agree with you selection. I mean I have so many cook books I literally could never finish all of those recipes :) Great article! xoxo Katie http://whatskatieupto.com

    • jules 3 December, 2015, 7:04 pm

      Thx Katie! Great minds :(

  • Madge 4 December, 2015, 10:21 am

    Jules congratulations on your pregnancy, somehow I missed that very important news. So happy for you and thank you for all your inspiration during the year. You probably already know but Vita Wheat 9 grain are recommended. We all started eating them when my daughter had gestational diabetes last year, it cut down the whole families carbs. Her baby girl is 6 months now and is fine.

  • lucy 8 December, 2015, 7:24 am

    hi jules, lovely list. i ADORED anna jones’ a modern way to cook. sold lots of it at werk, too.

    just got an odd email from you asking for email verification – found it in spam folder – wondered if it was a genuine one?

    happy end of 2015! xx

    • Leanna 8 December, 2015, 9:41 am

      Oh I got one too!! Checking to be sure it is legitimate.

    • Caroline (Jules Assistant) 8 December, 2015, 9:46 am

      Hi Lucy and Leanna,

      This email is a legitimate. Jules is changing over her email service provider as she has been having a lot of problems with delivery and so please click the link and confirm.

  • Amanda 16 March, 2016, 1:49 pm

    Wondering your thoughts of just using red lentils and skipping the tahini all together? My kids are sensitive to tahini, and almonds, cashews and most nuts and seeds with the exception of pumpkin, hemp, flax, and chia…..

    • Caroline (Jules Assistant) 17 March, 2016, 6:58 pm

      Hi Amanda, Jules said that you could definitely skip the tahini here. If you are ok with dairy you could add some grated Parmesan for flavour but not essential. It won’t be as thick though. Let us know how you go if you try it!

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